Divestment Discussion

On Sunday 22nd April, we held an intimate but very engaged discussion around divestment. We were joined by Dr James Smith from Fossil Free Cambridgeshire, who brought us all up to date on what divestment is, how the campaign developed and where we currently are in our progress.

We ended the discussion on what we can all do now, going forwards. It was clear there is a strong need to get out into our communities and talk to our family, colleagues, neighbours and anyone else that may be interested, to help spread the word on divestment.

We will be in Cambridge on Monday next week (8th May 17), engaging with local council workers, and then in Peterborough on Friday (12th May 17) doing the same. If you want to get involved, or have any questions, please do get in touch.

Useful Resources

https://gofossilfree.org/uk/ is the UK campaign group website, full of facts, figures and resources.

The following page lists all the current groups around the country, so if you are not in Cambridgeshire and would like to join your local group, you can search and make contact: https://gofossilfree.org/uk/local-government/

We shared a councillor briefing document that you can send to your councillor, which can be found here: https://gofossilfree.org/uk/wp-content/uploads/sites/3/2016/09/Fossil-Fuel-Divestment_v2-1.pdf

Discussions

We have held a number of talks across the the past few months starting with our fringe event as part of the PECT Green Festival, a discussion titled ‘Consumerism: What we buy and the alternatives’. It was a very healthy turnout and a very healthy discussion, with lots of input from the attendees and lots to take away and think about. We covered the topic from the angle of the individual consumer, looking at buying habits when it comes to food. Do we shop locally in the market and the butchers or do we go to the supermarket? Do we buy organic? Do we buy in season? We also looked briefly at the fashion industry, both in terms of clothing and in terms of buying for the home. Is it really a taboo to buy second-hand? In the second half we changed tactics, and looked at consumerism as a societal model. Are we just pawns on a chess board? Do we really have a voice? Sadly we had to bring it to an end for the day, but as the enthusiasm and passion was clear, we have decided to run other discussions like this in the future; looking at specific situations like consumerism of the new parent, and revisiting topics which we just scratched the surface of like social structures. If you have any ideas on topics you would like to discuss, please get in touch and we can add them into the mix.

In September 2016, as part of the International Picnic held at The Green Backyard, we held a discussion on Food and Globalisation. Again, it was a very healthy turnout with a really active discussion. We looked at what different cultures across the world would typically eat and how much it would cost. Generally the west were eating the processed packaged diet with the highest price tags and the developing countries eating food in much more natural states, with fresh fruit and vegetables, pulses and grains, which were also the cheaper options, although we did discuss if this was due to choices and availability. Those in attendance mostly commented that they have a fairly natural diet, however were aware they had processed and packaged food too, and aware on their privilege to have this. We also touched on the topic of where our food was coming from, local independent stores or supermarkets, whether to buy organic or not and so much more.

In October, we partnered with Metal for the Lucy + Jorge Orta: Food exhibition for the Waste Not Want Not discussion. This saw people from inspiring grassroot movements from across the country give presentations of their projects and raise awareness about the amount of food that is wasted and what we can do about it. From asking our supermarkets to only bake the bread they know they can sell, to being more accepting of oddly shaped fruit and vegetables. In addition, they spoke about the differences between best before and use by dates and the fact that what is most important is to use our senses to be our own judge about what we eat.

We do plan on holding some more discussions in future, and if you would like to hold a discussion, you do not need to be an expert, just an interest in talking about an issue, please do get in touch.