GBY Christmas Fair

To celebrate the festive season, we attend The Green Backyard Christmas fair yesterday. Our main focus at the event was gathering Eco Christmas Tips and decorating our Christmas tree. There were some great ideas:

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Buy all your Christmas presents from charity shops
Wrap presents in pretty material and ribbon to save waste and refuse
Make homemade decorations (popcorn tinsel, dried fruit tree decs, paper chains)
Use Christmas cards for next years gift tags
Buy artificial christmas tree rather than a real one and take good care of it to make it last
Collect people’s Christmas trees and reclaim the wood
Make turkey stock from the bones (freeze in portion size if not all needed at once)
Cook meals from scratch rather than buying ready meals (can do the same for sweets and cakes)
Make homemade presents
Buy a present for someone that has nothing
Give the gift of time (an event simply time spent together)
Buy christmas cards from recycled paper
Give money to a charity instead of buying a present, as the present
Reuse your wrapping paper for next year.

What’s your favourite tip? Do you have any more? Feel free to share below.

In addition to this, we were also joined by Fossil Free Cambridgeshire, gaining more momentum for the energy project, gathering signatures for the petition (https://campaigns.gofossilfree.org/petitions/fossil-free-cambridgeshire-divest-now) and sharing information regarding the project and Transition as a whole.

Finally, we wish you all a very happy festive season!

Discussions

We have held a number of talks across the the past few months starting with our fringe event as part of the PECT Green Festival, a discussion titled ‘Consumerism: What we buy and the alternatives’. It was a very healthy turnout and a very healthy discussion, with lots of input from the attendees and lots to take away and think about. We covered the topic from the angle of the individual consumer, looking at buying habits when it comes to food. Do we shop locally in the market and the butchers or do we go to the supermarket? Do we buy organic? Do we buy in season? We also looked briefly at the fashion industry, both in terms of clothing and in terms of buying for the home. Is it really a taboo to buy second-hand? In the second half we changed tactics, and looked at consumerism as a societal model. Are we just pawns on a chess board? Do we really have a voice? Sadly we had to bring it to an end for the day, but as the enthusiasm and passion was clear, we have decided to run other discussions like this in the future; looking at specific situations like consumerism of the new parent, and revisiting topics which we just scratched the surface of like social structures. If you have any ideas on topics you would like to discuss, please get in touch and we can add them into the mix.

In September 2016, as part of the International Picnic held at The Green Backyard, we held a discussion on Food and Globalisation. Again, it was a very healthy turnout with a really active discussion. We looked at what different cultures across the world would typically eat and how much it would cost. Generally the west were eating the processed packaged diet with the highest price tags and the developing countries eating food in much more natural states, with fresh fruit and vegetables, pulses and grains, which were also the cheaper options, although we did discuss if this was due to choices and availability. Those in attendance mostly commented that they have a fairly natural diet, however were aware they had processed and packaged food too, and aware on their privilege to have this. We also touched on the topic of where our food was coming from, local independent stores or supermarkets, whether to buy organic or not and so much more.

In October, we partnered with Metal for the Lucy + Jorge Orta: Food exhibition for the Waste Not Want Not discussion. This saw people from inspiring grassroot movements from across the country give presentations of their projects and raise awareness about the amount of food that is wasted and what we can do about it. From asking our supermarkets to only bake the bread they know they can sell, to being more accepting of oddly shaped fruit and vegetables. In addition, they spoke about the differences between best before and use by dates and the fact that what is most important is to use our senses to be our own judge about what we eat.

We do plan on holding some more discussions in future, and if you would like to hold a discussion, you do not need to be an expert, just an interest in talking about an issue, please do get in touch.

Forward Planning – April 2016

At our April meeting we decided we needed a main project to focus our energy with a clear objective. We started with thoughts around the main purpose of the transition movement, which is to be environmentally sustainable and to reduce CO2 emissions. And so we took up a new project to get the council to divest their pension fund from fossil fuels. After discovering that the pension fund does not sit with the city council, but the county council, we contacted 350.org, an organisation who help with community divestment campaigns. They put us in touch with Fossil Free Cambridgeshire (FFC), who had been running since early 2015 and we now collaborate with FFC on this campaign/project.

Our plan is 2 fold:

  • We would like to see Peterborough City Council sign up to divestment.
  • Work with FFC to get Cambridgeshire County Council Pension Fund Committee to agree to divest from fossil fuels

If you would like to join in with this project, or simply would like to find out more about it, please just come along to our next meeting.

Do we have a future?

At the last monthly meeting, on September 6th, it was agreed by those present that Peterborough in Transition was in crisis. Over the last year there has been a decline in the number of people attending meetings on a regular basis, and despite some recent successes (our May Day celebration, and the Carbon Conversations group) there has been a loss of energy and purpose, in large part due to the fact that many of those who have given the most time and energy to PinT over the last few years can no longer do so. In some cases this is because people are now concentrating their efforts on The Green Backyard; in others it is because they have increased work or family commitments. There are no longer enough people willing and able to facilitate our monthly meeting or take minutes for it, nor are we able to start new projects as most of those coming to meetings are already very busy. All these factors conspire together to make it difficult to attract new regular members to the group.

It was therefore agreed by those present that our monthly meetings would be suspended for the time being. Perhaps we need to take a break for a few months, until more of us are once again able to commit to coming to meetings on a regular basis and have more time to take the group forward. Perhaps we need to change the time and format of our meetings. However, there was a consensus at the meeting that PinT needs to gain a new vision, and come up with some project ideas that are both achievable and give some energy and purpose to the group if it is to be worth continuing Peterborough in Transition’s existence. It remains to be seen whether there are enough of us willing to commit to coming to our proposed “Visioning Day” for this to happen.

If you are interested in helping to ensure that Peterborough in Transition does have a future, or have ideas for our Visioning Day and you are willing to help ensure the day does take place, then please get in touch with us via our regular email address. Currently, the plan is to devise a survey that will enable us to see what what appetite there is for the group’s continued existence, and, if this does exist, to hold the Visioning Day some time early next year.